Surah Al-Fatiha

Muslims believe in the Qur’an as a revelation given in Arabic from Allah. Translations into other languages are considered to be merely superficial “interpretations” of the meanings and not authentic versions, the word of God, of the Qur’an. In addition the term Bismillah Ir’Rahman Ir’Rahim is actually the first verse of Al-fatiha as often it would be a pre-saying to the surahs.

Arabic: 1.1 بِسْمِ اللّهِ الرَّحْمـَنِ الرَّحِيم

1:2 الْحَمْدُ للّهِ رَبِّ الْعَالَمِين

1:3 الرَّحمـنِ الرَّحِيم

1:4 مَـالِكِ يَوْمِ الدِّين

1:5 إِيَّاك نَعْبُدُ وإِيَّاكَ نَسْتَعِين

1:6 اهدِنَــــا الصِّرَاطَ المُستَقِيمَ

1:7 صِرَاطَ الَّذِينَ أَنعَمتَ عَلَيهِمْ غَيرِ المَغضُوبِ عَلَيهِمْ وَلاَ الضَّالِّين

Transliteration:

Al-Fatiha | 7 verses | The Opening | سورة الفاتحة Sura #1 | Makkah

Bismillāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm
Al ḥamdu lillāhi rabbi l-‘ālamīn
Ar raḥmāni r-raḥīm
Māliki yawmi d-dīn
Iyyāka na’budu wa iyyāka nasta’īn
Ihdinā ṣ-ṣirāṭ al-mustaqīm
Ṣirāṭ al-laḏīna an’amta ‘alayhim ġayril maġḍūbi ‘alayhim walāḍ ḍāllīn

Translation: [Quran 1:1].

In the name of Allah, the most beneficent the most merciful.

All praise is due to Allah, Lord of the worlds.

The most beneficent, the most merciful.

The lord of the day of Judgement.

Thee alone do we worship and thee alone we seek for help.

Guide us to the right path.

The path of those upon whom thou has bestowed favors, Not of those who thou has cursed once nor of those who have gone astray.

Written by Mir Emad Hassani in 1570s.

The first verse, transliterated as “Bismillāhir Rahmānir Rahīm“, may be familiar to non-Arabic speakers and non-Muslims because of its ubiquity in Arabic and Muslim societies. This verse appears at the start of every chapter in the Qur’an with the exception of the ninth chapter. The verse is normally said before reciting a chapter or part of a chapter during daily prayer, and also before public proclamations and indeed before many personal and everyday activities in many Arabic and Muslim societies as a way to invoke God’s blessing and proclaim one’s motives before an undertaking.

The two words “ar Rahmān” and “ar Rahīm” are often translated in English as “the Beneficent” and “the Merciful” or “the Generous.” They are often also translated as superlatives, for example, “the Most Generous” and “the Most Merciful”. Grammatically the two words “Rahmaan” and “Raheem” are different linguistic forms of the triconsonantal root R-H-M, connoting “mercy”. (For more information, see the section on root forms in Semitic languages). The form “Rahmaan” denotes degree or extent, i.e., “Most Merciful,” while “Raheem” denotes time permanence, i.e., “Ever Merciful”.

The second verse’s “الحمد الله” ranks as one of the most popular phrases in all of Arabic, being used to express one’s well-being, general happiness, or even consolation in a disaster (see Alhamdulillah). The verse is also significant in that it includes a relationship between the two most common names for God in Arabic “الله” and “رب”. The first word is a ubiquitous name for God, and the second roughly translates to “Lord.” It shares the same root with the Hebrew “Rabbi”. In some printings of the Qur’an, both words appear in red everywhere in the Qur’an.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Fatiha

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